Capital Needs Meetings

Streets and Sidewalks • Public Safety Facilities • Parks and Recreation • Economic Development • Housing

Nine Convenient Meeting LocationsWinston-Salem bonds logo

  • March 21, 6 p.m., Carl H. Russell Community Center, 3521 Carver School Road
  • March 22, 6 p.m., Hanes Hosiery Community Center, 501 Reynolds Blvd.
  • March 27, 6 p.m., Miller Park Community Center, 400 Leisure Lane
  • March 28, 6 p.m., Georgia E. Taylor Neighborhood Center, 1471 W. Clemmonsville Road
  • March 29, 6:30 p.m., Parkview Church of God, 3263 Kernersville Road
  • April 3, 6 p.m., Polo Park Community Center, 1850 Polo Road
  • April 4, 6 p.m., South Fork Community Center, 4403 Country Club Road
  • April 5, 6 p.m., Winston Lake Golf Course Clubhouse, 3535 Winston Lake Road
  • April 12, 6 p.m., Salem Lake Marina, 1001 Salem Lake Road

All meetings will include a video presentation and information tables with displays of the proposed projects. City staff will be available to answer questions.

On This Page


Why Have These Meetings?

The bonds that citizens approved in November 2014 allowed the city to make a start on its backlog of unfunded capital needs. However, Winston-Salem still has $632.3 million in unfunded needs for streets, sidewalks, buildings, parks, infrastructure and equipment.

The City Council recently reviewed our unfunded needs and proposed that the city move forward with $122 million worth of projects, in five categories:

  • Streets and Sidewalks: $43.7 million
  • Parks and Recreation: $31 million
  • Public Safety Facilities: $21.1 million
  • Economic Development: $14.5 million
  • Housing: $11.7 million

The list of projects includes only items that are the responsibility of city government. They do not include schools, libraries or other projects that are the responsibility of county and state government.

The council is considering a bond referendum to finance these projects. Before moving forward, the City Council wants feedback from citizens.


Proposed Timetable

  • April/May: City Council reviews citizen feedback from capital needs meetings.
  • May 21: City Council approves publishing notice of intent to hold a referendum and submitting an application to the Local Government Commission.
  • August 6: City Council holds a public hearing, adopts the bond orders, and sets the date for the bond referendum.
  • November 6: Date of bond referendum

Q&A

How were the projects selected?

The City Council met earlier this year to review the city's unfunded capital needs, consider the recommendations of the Citizens' Capital Needs Committee, discuss what projects would be appropriate for a bond referendum and determine what the city could afford to address and the potential impact on tax rates. City staff took their guidance and developed a list of potential projects, which the council then refined into the list of projects (details below).

Could the list of projects change?

Yes. The City Council will review comments from citizens at the capital needs meetings before finalizing the list of projects that would go before the voters.

Why pay for these projects with bonds?

General obligation bonds are the least-expensive way to finance these projects, thanks to the city's high credit rating. Because our credit rating is high and the bonds are guaranteed by the city's taxing authority, the city will pay less interest on the bonds than if it used some other form of financing.

What effect will this have on my taxes?

If the city were to finance all $122 million in projects, the city Finance Department estimates that the city property tax rate could increase up to 4 cents, starting in July 2019.  Based on this, the owner of a house valued at $200,000 would pay $80 more in property taxes starting in August 2019. This works out to about $6.67 per month.

Why can't we pay as we go?

The city uses pay-as-you-go financing for many of its capital needs. However, this is not sufficient to meet all of our capital needs, resulting in the current backlog of $632.3 million in unfunded capital needs. Borrowing $122 million will allow the city to address the most pressing of these needs and pay the money back over time, much as people do when they borrow money to buy a house or a vehicle.

When will the City Council decide on a bond referendum?

In order to ensure that the bonds can be voted on in November, the City Council must act by August 6. This gives sufficient time for the N.C. Local Government Commission to review the proposed bonds and authorize the city to hold the bond referendum. The commission acts as a safety check to ensure that local governments do not issue more debt than they can afford to repay.

Why do we have to vote on these bonds?

When a city issues general obligation bonds, it pledges its "full faith and credit" to repay the bonds.  To assure that the city will meet this commitment, voters are required to vote in a referendum that would authorize a tax levy, if needed, to repay the bonds.

Didn't we just approve bonds in 2016?  Why are we having another referendum so soon?

The 2016 bond referendum was held by Forsyth County, not the city of Winston-Salem, to raise money for schools and other items that are the responsibility of county government.

City voters approved bonds in 2014. Why are we having another bond referendum?

The bonds that citizens approved in November 2014 allowed the city to make a start on its backlog of unfunded capital needs. However, there were many more needs that were not funded in 2014. These proposed bonds would allow the city to continue the progress that was started in 2014.


Proposed Projects

Scroll for line items | Go to project details

Locator map of proposed Bond Projects [pdf]

Streets and Sidewalks

Go to project details

Street Resurfacing $13,600,000
Concrete Street Rehabilitation $6,230,000
Business 40 Corridor Improvements $3,900,000
Polo Road Improvements $3,670,000
Liberty and Main Streets 2-way Conversion $3,600,000
First and Second Streets 2-way Conversion $2,800,000
Multi-Use Path $2,300,000
East End Area Plan - Phase I $2,000,000
Little Creek Greenway - Phase II $1,500,000
Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements $1,400,000
Streetscape Improvements - Phase I $1,000,000
Salem Creek Greenway Pedestrian Sidepath $1,000,000
Greenway Development $800,000
Total $43,700,000

Parks and Recreation

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Recreation and Parks Facility Renewal $6,570,000
Winston Lake Park Improvements - Phase II $5,300,000
Salem Lake Park Improvements - Phase II $3,700,000
Quarry Park Development - Phase II $3,100,000
Washington Park Renovations $2,500,000
Hanes Park Improvements - Phase II $2,000,000
Playground Renovations $1,870,000
Carl H. Russell Community Center Renovation $1,160,000
Park Land Acquisition & Park Development $1,000,000
Bethania-Rural Hall Road Pocket Park $1,000,000
Strollway Renovations $1,000,000
Georgetown Neighborhood Pocket Park $800,000
William R. Anderson Jr. Gym Renovation $500,000
Easton Park Restrooms $500,000
Total $31,000,000

Public Safety Facilities

Go to project details

Public Safety Radio Communications System $9,000,000
New Fire Station $5,000,000
Fire Station #3 Replacement (North Liberty Street) $3,600,000
Public Safety Training Complex $3,500,000
Total $21,100,000

Economic Development

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Economic Development Sites/Infrastructure $10,000,000
Liberty Street Redevelopment - Phase 1 $2,500,000
Commercial Redevelopment in Blighted Areas $2,000,000
Total $14,500,000

Housing

Go to project details

Neighborhood Revitalization $10,000,000
East Ward Neighborhood Revitalization $1,700,000
Total $11,700,000

Streets and Sidewalks ($43.7 million) project details

Street Resurfacing: $13.6 million

The City of Winston-Salem maintains 1,013.52 centerline miles of hard surface streets. This project would allow the city to resurface and estimated 64 centerline miles of streets.

Concrete Base Street Rehabilitation: $6.23 million

The city has many streets that were built with concrete and substandard curb and gutter. The concrete base has exceeded its life expectancy. Asphalt has been applied on top of the concrete street in a thin layer to provide enough remaining gutter to carry stormwater, but this thin layer is constantly breaking and popping off. This project would convert the concrete streets to asphalt
streets, and allow for easier and more effective repairs when required.

Street to Fix Location of Fix
Arbor Road From Robinhood Road to Country Club Road
Bitting Road From Club Park Road to Westview Drive
E. Fifth Street From Lowery Court to Old Greensboro Road
18th Street From N. Liberty Street to the dead end
Fairfax Drive From Windsor Road to the dead end
Lynn Avenue From Windsor Road to Greenwich Road
Windsor Road From Plymouth Avenue to Fairfax Drive
Woodbine Road From Westover Avenue to Buena Vista Road

Business 40 Corridor Enhancements: $3.8 million

The city of Winston-Salem and Creative Corridors Coalition have committed to upgrading the appearance of the Business 40 corridor when the highway is rebuilt. This project would fund the clear noise wall on the Peters Creek Parkway Bridge, as well as other enhancements as funds allow, which could include monument foundations at bridges, pedestrian level lighting and enhanced landscaping.

Polo Road Improvements: $3.67 million

This project would fund safety improvements related to traffic flow on Polo Road between Reynolda Road and Long Drive. The project would include pedestrian improvements such as pedestrian signals, crosswalks, curb ramps and signs; and bicycle lanes.

Liberty and Main Streets Two-Way Conversion: $3.6 million

The reconstruction of Business 40 will eliminate the ramps at Liberty and Main Streets. To facilitate downtown travel with this change, the Chamber of Commerce Business 40 Task Force recommends that Liberty Street and Main Street be converted to two-way traffic. This project would fund the conversion of Liberty and Main streets between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Brookstown Avenue after the reopening of Business 40 in 2020.

First and Second Streets Two-Way Conversion: $2.8 million

The reconstruction of Business 40 will eliminate the ramps at Liberty and Main streets while leaving in place the ramps at Cherry and Marshall streets. To facilitate downtown travel with this change, the Chamber of Commerce Business 40 Task Force recommends that portions of First Street and Second Street be converted to two-way traffic. This project would fund the conversion of First and Second streets along most of their lengths between Peters Creek Parkway and Church Street, except for the portions indicated in red on the map. The conversion would be implemented after the reopening of Business 40 in 2020.

Multi-Use Path: $2.3 million

To allow for pedestrian and bicycle access between Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and downtown along the Business 40 corridor, a multi-use path has been included in the Business 40 rebuild project. The path would provide a separated transportation route for cyclists and pedestrians and would have connections along the way between residential neighborhoods, employment centers, and recreational land uses, including BB&T Ballpark. This project would fund the portion of the path from Peters Creek Parkway to Lockland Avenue, which is outside the scope of the Business 40 project.

 

East End Area Plan - Phase I: Fifth Street Streetscape Improvements: $2 million

The East End Area Plan includes improving the appearance and function of East Fifth Street through streetscaping. This project would provide funds to conduct streetscape improvements along Fifth Street, in the area between U.S. 52 and Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive.

Little Creek Greenway - Phase II: $1.5 million

This project would fund extension of the Little Creek Greenway from its current end to Somerset Drive, a distance of 3,500 feet.

Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements: $1.4 million

Funding for this project would be used to improve bicycle and pedestrian accessibility throughout the city. Projects could include repairing current bicycle and pedestrian facilities as needed, constructing roadway safety improvements, and expanding sidewalks and bike lanes.

 

Salem Creek Greenway Pedestrian Sidepath: $1 million

This project would provide funds to construct a pedestrian sidepath connecting the Salem Creek Greenway and Marketplace Mall to Silas Creek Parkway. The pedestrian sidepath would consist of a wide, ADA-compliant paved walkway running along Peters Creek Parkway from Marketplace Mall to Link Road, along Link Road to Lockland Avenue, and down Lockland Avenue to Silas Creek Parkway. Pedestrian crossings would be added at the intersections of Peters Creek Parkway and Link Road and at Link Road and Lockland Avenue.

Streetscape Improvements - Phase I: $1 million

A streetscape comprises the visual elements of a street, such as the road itself, trees and other plantings, lighting, benches, bike racks, and public art. Streetscapes give the streets character and help create an identity for an area. Many cities have developed streetscape standards to aid this process. A Downtown Streetscape Plan is currently scheduled to be developed and presented by winter of 2018. The plan will include design standards and funding estimates. This project would provide funds to begin implementing the recommendations in the plan.

Greenway Development: $800,000

This project would create a reserve that would allow the city to expedite greenway construction by completely funding design work for future greenways with local dollars. Staff would then seek construction funding through various state and federal sources.

Parks and Recreation ($31 million) project details

Recreation and Parks Facility Renewal: $6.57 million

Property and Facilities Management has performed facility condition assessments on all recreation facilities and has established a schedule for the replacement of roofs, replacement of heating and air conditioning systems, painting, renewal of interior finishes, replacement and repair of electrical and lighting systems, and miscellaneous maintenance. Along with general facility renewal, this project would also include needed maintenance, improvements and upgrades to lighting, security, tennis courts, basketball courts and pools throughout the city.

Winston Lake Park Improvements - Phase II: $5.3 million

This project provides for further development of Winston Lake Park following Phase I renovations and improvements that were funded with the 2014 bonds. Proposed amenities and improvements in Phase II include a lakefront strollway, lake dredging and dam repairs, improved fishing facilities including a fishing pier and fishing pavilion with rest rooms, and pedestrian improvements.

Salem Lake Park Improvements - Phase II: $3.7 million

Phase I of renovations and improvements to Salem Lake Park was funded with the 2014 bonds and included a new Marina Center, restrooms, parking improvements and playground. Proposed improvements and amenities funded in Phase II include renovating the shoreline bulkhead, rebuilding the boat ramp, adding kayak storage and boat slips, and building a picnic shelter near the playground.

Quarry Park Development - Phase II: $3.1 million

This project provides for further development of the new Quarry Park built with the 2014 bonds. Proposed amenities for Phase II include a playground, picnic shelters, pedestrian infrastructure and expanding and paving the parking lot.

Washington Park Renovations: $2.5 million

A master plan was recently completed for Washington Park. The proposed funding of $2,500,000 would finance renovations to the basketball court and adjacent fitness area, replacing the restrooms, restoring historic infrastructure and shelters, building new concrete pedestrian paths and adding a picnic pavilion.

Hanes Park Improvements - Phase II: $2 million

Funds for this project would allow completion of the second phase of improvements to Hanes Park. Phase I is currently underway. Phase II would include renovating the Joe White Tennis Center and the hard- and soft-surface tennis courts, resurfacing the track and constructing an overlook along Hawthorne Road.

Playground Renovations: $1.87 million

This project would provide replacements and upgrades for playgrounds in select parks. Playgrounds are replaced based on annual safety assessments, condition of the equipment and overall usage. Potential parks could include Reynolds, Skyland, Lockland and Bolton.

Carl H. Russell Community Center Renovation: $1.16 million

The Carl H. Russell Community Center opened in 1987 and was North Carolina's first community center with gigabit internet access. Over time, increased demand for quality rental space and issues related to deferred maintenance have driven the need to make several upgrades/repairs to the community center. This project would provide funding for renovation of Carl H. Russell Community Center and could serve as a model for similar renovations across the city. Proposed renovations include new paint and updated interior lighting. Outdoor renovations could include exterior lighting improvements, improved accessibility, security improvements and several landscaping improvements around the community center.

 

Strollway Renovations: $1 million

The Strollway provides a pedestrian and bike connection between downtown and the Salem Creek Greenway. The Strollway was completed 30 years ago, and its current condition presents several hazards to users. This project would include resurfacing and minor bridge repair.

Bethania-Rural Hall Pocket Park: $1 million

This project would create a neighborhood park to fill an unmet need in the Bethania Freedman's Community along Bethania-Rural Hall Road, adjacent to Fire Station 20. The park could include a gazebo, picnic tables, walking path and benches.

Park Land Acquisition and Park Development: $1 million

This project would create a reserve fund to be used exclusively for future acquisition of land that could be developed into future park land and open space. Funding would be available for sites throughout the city.

Georgetown Pocket Park: $800,000

This project would create a neighborhood park to fill an unmet need in the Georgetown neighborhood in the North Ward. Park amenities would include a playground and benches. A specific park location has not been identified.

William R. Anderson Jr. Gym Renovation: $500,000

The William R. Anderson Jr. Recreation Center gymnasium is heavily used. After successive resurfacings of the gymnasium floor over the years, the floor has reached the point where it cannot be resurfaced further. This project would pay for replacing the gym floor and new, expanded spectator seating.

Easton Park Restrooms: $500,000

Funding for this project would provide for the construction of new restrooms at Easton Park.

Public Safety Facilities ($21.1 million) project details

Public Safety Radio Communication System: $9 million

The current public safety radio communications system for both the city and county is more than 15 years old. It requires parts that can no longer be replaced and cannot be guaranteed to be serviced. A new system would contain new hardware and software that can make use and take advantage of the existing eight radio towers and would include the replacement of radios. Most city operations, including police, fire, and public works, will use the new communications system. The total cost of a new communications radio system is estimated to be $18 million and would be split 50/50 with the county.

New Fire Station: $5 million

National fire-protection standards call for a four-minute travel time for fire trucks to the scene of a fire. There is a 3.6 square-mile area in the vicinity of Burke Mill Road that is outside this 4-minute standard. This area includes Hanes Mall, Forsyth Medical Center and other major commercial buildings, and this area is forecast to grow by 10 to 25 percent over the next four years. Construction and staging of a new fire station would close this gap. This area experiences a high number of annual requests for service and has 384 occupancies that score at least a moderate risk in the department's Occupancy Vulnerability Assessment Profile. The proposed fire station also would include a historic apparatus bay, highlighting the history of the department.

 

Public Safety Training Complex: $3.5 million

This project would fund land acquisition and master planning for a Public Safety Training Complex and construction of a 600' x 600' asphalt driving instruction pad for the Police Department that meets the specifications of the N.C. Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission. This is essential to ensuring police officers operate their vehicles safely and responsibly and use proper procedures during pursuit and traffic stops. The master plan would include facilities that would be funded and built at a future date, such as fire training building, a fire apparatus driving pad, and a fire maintenance facility.

Fire Station 3 Replacement: $3.6 million

Fire Station 3, located at 2995 North Liberty St., was completed in 1964 and has outlived the usefulness of its design. In addition to inadequate apparatus bays, dormitory space, and storage, the facility contains no classroom space, physical training facility or laundry room. HVAC system design is inadequate, requiring the use of window units. Office space must also be used as dormitory space, and there are only two showers. Replacement with a building similar to the new Fire Station 8 would alleviate these concerns.

Economic Development ($14.5 million) project details

Economic Development Sites/Infrastructure: $10 million

City staff, in conjunction with the Utility Commission and Winston-Salem Business Inc., have identified potential sites where future industrial or business parks could be located or infrastructure developed, including Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, Union Cross Business Park, Brookwood Business Park and Whitaker Park. Funds could be used to purchase land and for park development and infrastructure, including grading, water and sewer construction, and road construction. Development of business parks has proven to be a successful tool for creating jobs and expanding the tax base.

Liberty Street Redevelopment - Phase I: $2.5 million

Funds for this project would be used to address urban blight along the Liberty Street corridor. Phase I activities could include streetscape enhancements, property acquisition, demolition and clearing, land banking, and new construction.

Commercial Redevelopment in Blighted Areas: $2 million

This project would fund site improvements for businesses in targeted urban commercial areas as part of the city's Revitalizing Urban Commercial Areas (RUCA) Program. Funds for site improvements would be provided in the form of grants and low-interest loans to small business owners. Of the 27 total RUCA areas identified in Tiers 1, 2 and 3, only 11 have received funding.

Housing ($11.7 million) project details

Neighborhood Revitalization: $10 million

This project would provide for investments in neighborhoods within the city's Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area. Investments would focus on housing rehabilitation and multi-family housing development to increase the availability of workforce housing as a key component of the city’s neighborhood revitalization strategy. Assistance could be provided in the form of direct or deferred loans and grants.

East Ward Neighborhood Revitalization: $1.7 million

Funds for this project would provide for targeted housing development investments throughout the East Ward.


Feedback Form (Opens in new window)

The City Council wants your feedback on these projects and the proposed bond referendum. Click or tap to leave a comment. (Opens in new window)


Background Documents

February 26, 2018 Council of the Whole Bond Package Presentation [pdf/13p]
Detailed Descriptions of Proposed Bond Projects and Ward Maps [pdf/55p]
Citizens' Capital Needs Committee Final Report - December 2017

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