Mayor News

Office of the Mayor - August 22, 2019

Truliant Federal Credit Union is the first entity to make a substantial multi-year pledge to support the city’s Think Orange campaign to combat hunger in Winston-Salem. Truliant’s $25,000 pledge to the Think Orange Corporate Investment Fund will be fulfilled over five years.

"Food insecurity is a growing issue in our community," said Truliant President Todd Hall. "By supporting the Think Orange Corporate Investment Fund, we’re helping Winston-Salem become an even more livable city by lifting up those who are struggling with hunger, especially among children who are the future of our community. We're humbled to offer this pledge of support for those in need and ensure vulnerable families have nutritious meals."

Business and foundation leaders in Winston-Salem agreed to establish the fund during a roundtable meeting Mayor Allen Joines held in April. The fund has a goal of raising $100,000 a year for five years. The fund will allow the city to sustain the Think Orange campaign once the inaugural grant funding runs out at the end of this year.

Joines said, "On behalf of the citizens of Winston-Salem, I want to thank Truliant for their leadership in supporting the Think Orange campaign. Their pledge proves that they understand that hunger is an issue not only for those in need, but also for employers, and for our city as a whole."

Local agencies that fight hunger will be able to apply for grants from the Think Orange Corporate Investment Fund. The fund will be administered by the city. The city's Community Allocations Committee will review grant requests.

Joines and leaders of other government, non-profit and faith organizations announced the Think Orange campaign last August. The campaign is being funded through December with a $115,500 grant under the CHAMPS (Cities Combating Hunger Through Afterschool and Summer Meal Programs) program of the National League of Cities in partnership with the Food Research & Action Center. Winston-Salem was one of six cities selected to receive a 2018 CHAMPS grant and technical assistance from the National League of Cities to expand the use of federal nutrition programs to fight hunger in the community.

Partnering with the city for the campaign are the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Second Harvest Food Bank, the Winston-Salem Urban League, Ezekiel A.M.E. Zion Church, H.O.P.E. of Winston-Salem and Cobblestone Farmers Market.

The Winston-Salem metropolitan statistical area ranked seventh in 2017 on a national list of MSAs with the highest rate of food hardship, according to a report by the Food Action & Research Center. This was based on the center’s "How Hungry is America?" report, which contained data for every state, the District of Columbia and 108 metropolitan statistical areas for 2016–2017.

Actions: E-mail | Permalink |