Human Relations News

The City Council and the Human Relations Commission will honor the 2010 recipients of the Martin Luther King Jr. Young Dreamers Award at the City Council meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 19.

The award honors two emerging or proven young adult city residents between the ages of 18 and 40 who have made a tangible difference in the lives of those who otherwise might have been overlooked, ignored or disadvantaged.

Honored this year are TaMeicka Clear, who was instrumental in working with the local chapter of Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) to create an African-American support group designed specifically for family members, friends, and straight allies of African-Americans who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender; and James Gore, who has been an advocate for social equity in the Winston-Salem community.

The Human Relations Commission established the Young Dreamers Award in 2009 to encourage young adults to participate in philanthropic, altruistic community involvement that is in the spirit of how Martin Luther King Jr. lived and encouraged others to live.

  

Young Dreamers Award
2010 Honorees

TaMeicka Clear

TaMeicka Clear was instrumental in working with the local chapter of Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) to create an African-American support group designed specifically for family members, friends, and straight allies of African-Americans who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. She has been vital in teaching Winston-Salem PFLAG members how to respect and recognize the differences between African-American and white cultures on lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender issues.


James Gore

James Gore has been an advocate for social equity in different forms for several years in the Winston-Salem community. He currently focuses on social justice and equity issues for the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation. Prior to this, he worked as program director with One Economy Corporation and focused on efforts to bring broadband Internet access, online content and technology resources to low-income families. Gore also worked for the Winston-Salem Foundation, where he led the Black Philanthropy Initiative, a program that celebrates the traditions of sharing and charitable giving in the black community by increasing involvement in the distribution of charitable funds, building bonds across lines of race and class among donors, and increasing the Winston-Salem Foundation’s philanthropic relationships with the African-American community. Gore has been a volunteer board member with many local and national organizations, including the National Center for Black Philanthropy, Prodigals Community and Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods.

 

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