Heavy Amateur Athletics

Events include

Celtic CaborClachneart (16-lb Stone)
16 lb. & 22 lb. Hammer Throw
28 lb. & 56 lb. Weight Throw
56 lb. Weight toss for Height
Turning the Caber
Sheaf Toss (20 lb).

As most of our Athletes register by the end of December and we only have eight places available, athletes wishing to participate must pre-register no later than April 1, 2011. It is a traditional rule in Scottish Games that there must be more contestants than awards in order to hold the event. All contestants must sign a waiver. All contestants must be kilted. Decisions by the Athletic Director/Judge are final. See description of events below.

Ron Short – Athletic Director/Judge
Abby Groves – Heavy Athletic Event Coordinator
Jason McHone - Assistant Director/Field Marshall
Ed Raines – Assistant Field Marshal

For entry forms and specific information contact

Abby Groves
502 Huckleberry Loop
Mebane, NC 27302
(919) 304-9586
agroves@triad.rr.com

OR:

Ed Bodenheimer
(336) 403-4309
ed@bodenheimerplumbing.com

Registered Athletes

Description of Events

Clachneart

  • Related to ancient "Stone of Strength" similar to modern shotput.
  • Stone varies in size and weight from 16 to 21 pounds.
  • Stone is thrown with one hand from behind the trig.
  • Each put is measured from the point of the trig.

The Hammer Throw

  • May have originated as pastime for our men using blacksmith´s long-shafted hammer to exhibit prowess.
  • Hammer is 22-pound metal ball attached to a cane shaft 50 inches long.
  • Competitor winds up several times and throws over his head, but his feet cannot turn until hammer is released.
  • Measurement is from center of a 4´ 6" toeboard called a trig to a spot where the ball hits the ground first.
  • Three throws allowed.

28-lb and 56-lb Weight Throw For Distance

  • In 19th century Scotland, 56-pound weight was a standard measurement for half a hundred-weight.
  • Weight is attached to a ring handle and one link of large chain not more that 18 inches long.
  • Object is to throw as far as possible with one hand from behind the trig.
  • Three throws allowed.

The Caber Toss

  • Once known as "Ye Casting of ye Bar."
  • Most traditional of Scotish athletic events,dating to the 16th century.
  • Caber is a tapered and trimmed tree trunk between 17 and 21 feet long weighing 100 to 130 pounds.
  • Athlete picks up small end of caber, then squats down placing his hands on the caber as close to the ground as possible. He stands lifting the caber to chest height and balances it against his chest. Running forward for momentum he flips the caber upward, so that is somersaults in the air 180 degrees landing on the large end with the small end ideally perpendicular to him.
  • Three attempts are allowed, and toss is measured according to an imaginary clock face with the athlete standing at 6 o´clock and a perfect toss pointing toward 12 o´clock.

The Sheaf Toss

  • Not generally considered a "heavy sport," but a farming sport in Scotland.
  • Sheaf is a burlap bag filled with hay or straw weighing 16 pounds.
  • Object is to toss the bag up in the air over a crossbar using a pitchfork and not dislodging the crossbar.
  • Crossbar is raised until one competitor is declared the winner.
  • Sheaf can be tossed more that 25 feet in the air.

56-lb Weight Toss for Height

  • Same weight as used in distance throw.
  • Athlete stands with his back to (and almost directly under) the crossbar. He lifts weight with one hand, swings it far back between his legs, then brings it out in front of him releasing it to go over bar in a backward arc.
  • Three throws allowed.

Notify me about changes on this page

Receive E-Mail Notification When New Information is Posted on this Page
As a member, enjoy the benefits of MyCityofWS, including your choice of newsletters, and notifications about events and site updates. Login and Manage Your Subscriptions Now.

City Link 311

see holiday collection schedule

Farmers Market