Rollout News

Cart & Bin Autumn 2009
In this Edition

Plastic Bottles Landfill Ban Taking Effect Oct. 1
Why recycle?
Collection Changes for Thanksgiving Holiday
Stop that unwanted junk mail

Read this newsletter online: www.sanitation.cityofws.org


Plastic Bottles Landfill Ban Taking Effect Oct. 1

plastic bottles - RECYCLE!During the 2005 legislative session, the N.C. General Assembly passed House Bill 1465, banning plastic bottles from disposal effective October 1, 2009. The law does not apply to containers that are intended for use in the sale and distribution of motor oil.

Recycling plastic bottles conserves energy and resources and creates jobs; more than 14,000 people are employed in the recycling industry in North Carolina. Bottles can be recycled back into plastic bottles, or can have a completely new life as a different product - such as carpet, lumber, other types of containers or even clothing. North Carolina and the Southeast are home to plastic recycling plants hungry for material to make new products, so recycling your bottles is a great way to close the recycling loop!

At least 95 percent of North Carolina residents have access to some type of plastic bottle recycling through local government programs. Unfortunately, North Carolinians currently only recycle 18 percent of PET plastic bottles. Do your part - recycle plastic bottles - and explore the Recycle Today web site to learn how!

http://www.p2pays.org/BannedMaterials/PlasticBottles/index.asp

Recycle Today web site 

Why recycle?

Recycling, including composting, diverted 85 million tons of material away from disposal in 2007, up from 15 million tons in 1980, when 90 percent of municipal solid waste was being incinerated or buried in a landfill.

Recycling helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions that affect global climate. In 2007, the national recycling rate of 33.4 percent (85 million tons recycled) prevented the release of approximately 193 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent into the air. That’s roughly the amount emitted annually by 35 million cars.

Recycle Today web site

Collection Changes for Thanksgiving Holiday

City offices will be closed Thursday and Friday, Nov. 26-27, for the Thanksgiving Day holiday.

Garbage collection will be rescheduled because of the holiday.

  • Residents who normally have their garbage collected on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday will have their garbage collected a day early: Tuesday will be collected Monday, etc.
  • Residents with Friday garbage collection will have their garbage collected on Monday, Nov. 30.

Curbside recycling will be collected as normal on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

  • Residents with curbside recycling collection on Thursday and Friday will be collected a day late: Thursday on Friday, and Friday on Saturday.

Yard-waste cart route changes:

  • Yard-waste cart routes for Monday and Tuesday will both be collected on Monday, Nov. 23.
  • Wednesday yard carts will be collected on Tuesday, Nov. 24
  • Thursday will be collected on Wednesday, Nov. 25.

For more information, call City Link at 727-8000.

The Sanitation web site has a yearly holiday schedule


Save trees! Here’s how to stop that unwanted junk mail 

Here, courtesy of the Stop Junk Mail Kit web site, are some disturbing facts about junk mail:

More than 100 million trees are destroyed each year to produce junk mail; that’s the equivalent of clear-cutting the entire Rocky Mountain National Park every four months.

More than 62 billion pieces (four million tons) of junk mail are produced each year.

The energy used to produce and dispose of junk mail is equivalent to the energy required to operate 2.8 million cars.

 

About 28 billion gallons of water are wasted to produce and recycle junk mail each year.

The average American wastes about 70 hours a year dealing with junk mail.

Some 44 percent of all junk mail goes into the landfills unopened.

Want to reduce unwanted, unsolicited junk mail? These links can show you how:

Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance

Direct Marketing Association Choice

Federal Trade Commission 

 


Sanitation pages:
http://www.cityofws.org/Home/Departments/Sanitation/Articles/Sanitation  

Recycle Today pages:
http://www.cityofws.org/Home/Departments/RecycleToday/Articles/RecycleToday  

Go to the city web site:
http://www.cityofws.org

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CITY OF WINSTON-SALEM - Mayor: Allen Joines; City Council: Vivian H. Burke, Mayor Pro Tempore, Northeast Ward; Denise D. Adams, North Ward; Dan Besse, Southwest Ward; Robert C. Clark, West Ward; Molly Leight, South Ward; Wanda Merschel, Northwest Ward; Derwin L. Montgomery, East Ward; Wanda Merschel, Northwest Ward; James Taylor Jr., Southeast Ward; City Manager: Lee Garrity

 

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