Streets & Sidewalks

Overview of Projects

  • Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements: $1,400,000
  • Business 40 Corridor Improvements: $3,800,000
  • Concrete Street Rehabilitation: $6,230,000
  • East End Area Plan - Phase I: $2,000,000
  • First and Second Streets 2-way Conversion: $2,800,000
  • Greenway Development: $800,000
  • Liberty and Main Streets 2-way Conversion: $3,600,000
  • Little Creek Greenway - Phase II: $1,500,000
  • Multi-Use Path: $2,300,000
  • Polo Road Improvements: $3,670,000
  • Salem Creek Greenway Pedestrian Sidepath: $1,000,000
  • Street Resurfacing: $13,600,000
  • Streetscape Improvements - Phase I: $1,000,000
  • Total: $43,700,000

Street Resurfacing: $13.6 Million

The City of Winston-Salem maintains 1,013.52 centerline miles of hard surface streets. This project would allow the city to resurface an estimated 83 centerline miles of streets.

Concrete Base Street Rehabilitation: $6.23 Million

The city has many streets that were built with concrete and substandard curb and gutter. The concrete base has exceeded its life expectancy. Asphalt has been applied on top of the concrete street in a thin layer to provide enough remaining gutter to carry stormwater, but this thin layer is constantly breaking and popping off. This project would rehab segments of eight streets with a one-time fix for a minimum of 15 to 20 years.

Business 40 Corridor Enhancements: $3.8 Million

The City of Winston-Salem and Creative Corridors Coalition have committed to upgrading the appearance of the Business 40 corridor when the highway is rebuilt. This project would fund the clear noise wall on the Peters Creek Parkway Bridge, as well as other enhancements as funds allow, which could include monument foundations at bridges, pedestrian level lighting and enhanced landscaping.

Polo Road Improvements: $3.67 Million

This project would fund safety improvements related to traffic flow on Polo Road between Reynolda Road and Long Drive. The project would include pedestrian improvements such as:

  • Bicycle lanes
  • Crosswalks
  • Curb ramps
  • Pedestrian signals
  • Signs

Liberty & Main Streets Two-Way Conversion: $3.6 Million

The reconstruction of Business 40 will eliminate the ramps at Liberty and Main streets. To facilitate downtown travel with this change, the Chamber of Commerce Business 40 Task Force recommends that Liberty Street and Main Street be converted to two-way traffic. This project would fund the conversion of Liberty and Main streets between Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Brookstown Avenue after the reopening of Business 40 in 2020.

First & Second Streets Two-Way Conversion: $2.8 Million

The reconstruction of Business 40 will eliminate the ramps at Liberty and Main streets while leaving in place the ramps at Cherry and Marshall streets. To facilitate downtown travel with this change, the Chamber of Commerce Business 40 Task Force recommends that portions of First Street and Second Street be converted to two-way traffic. This project would fund the conversion of First and Second streets along most of their lengths between Peters Creek Parkway and Church Street, except for the portions indicated in red on the map. The conversion would be implemented after the reopening of Business 40 in 2020.

East End Area Plan - Phase I: Fifth Street Streetscape Improvements: $2 Million

The East End Area Plan includes improving the appearance and function of East Fifth Street through streetscaping. This project would provide funds to conduct streetscape improvements along Fifth Street, in the area between U.S. 52 and Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive.

Multi-Use Path: $2.3 Million

To allow for pedestrian and bicycle access between Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and downtown along the Business 40 corridor, a multi-use path has been included in the Business 40 rebuild project. The path would provide a separated transportation route for cyclists and pedestrians and would have connections along the way between residential neighborhoods, employment centers, and recreational land uses, including BB&T Ballpark. This project would fund the portion of the path from Peters Creek Parkway to Lockland Avenue, which is outside the scope of the Business 40 project.

Little Creek Greenway - Phase II: $1.5 Million

This project would fund an extension of the Little Creek Greenway from its current end to Somerset Drive, a distance of 3,500 feet.

Bicycle/Pedestrian Improvements: $1.4 Million

Funding for this project would be used to improve bicycle and pedestrian accessibility throughout the city. Projects could include repairing current bicycle and pedestrian facilities as needed, constructing roadway safety improvements, and expanding sidewalks and bike lanes.

Streetscape Improvements - Phase I: $1 Million

A streetscape comprises the visual elements of a street, such as:

  • Benches
  • Bike racks
  • Lighting
  • Public art
  • Road itself
  • Trees and other plantings

Benefits of Streetscapes & Project Details

Streetscapes give the streets character and help create an identity for an area. Many cities have developed streetscape standards to aid this process. A Downtown Streetscape Plan is currently scheduled to be developed and presented by winter of 2018. The plan will include design standards and funding estimates. This project would provide funds to begin implementing the recommendations in the plan.

Salem Creek Greenway Pedestrian Sidepath: $1 Million

This project would provide funds to construct a pedestrian sidepath connecting the Salem Creek Greenway and Marketplace Mall to Silas Creek Parkway. The pedestrian sidepath would consist of a wide, ADA-compliant paved walkway running along Peters Creek Parkway from Marketplace Mall to Link Road, along Link Road to Lockland Avenue, and down Lockland Avenue to Silas Creek Parkway. Pedestrian crossings would be added at the intersections of Peters Creek Parkway and Link Road and at Link Road and Lockland Avenue.

Greenway Development: $800,000

This project would create a reserve that would allow the city to expedite greenway construction by completely funding design work for future greenways with local dollars. Staff would then seek construction funding through various state and federal sources.